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BEFORE AN EMERGENCY STRIKES

Wednesday, 22 February, 2017

ema suppliesCreate an Emergency Plan

 

Steps to take in creating a household emergency plan include:

 

  • Schedule a family meeting to discuss the dangers of possible emergency events including fire, severe weather, hazardous spills and terrorism.
  • Discuss how you and your family will respond to each possible emergency.
  • Discuss what to do in case of power outages or personal injuries.
  • Draw a floor plan of your home and mark two escape routes from each room.
  • Because it is often easier to call long distance during an emergency than within the affected area, choose an out-of-state friend or relative whom all family members will call if separated during an emergency.
  • Pick two meeting places – one near your home and one outside your neighborhood in case you cannot return home after an emergency.
  • Keep family records in a water- and fireproof safe. Inexpensive models can be purchased at most hardware stores.

Watches and Warnings

 

Oklahomans are reminded that tornadoes can occur any time of year. Knowing the difference between watches and warnings can help save lives. 

 

A TORNADO WATCH means tornadoes are possible. 

 

A TORNADO WARNING means a tornado has been sighted. 

 

When a TORNADO WARNING is issued, take shelter in a basement, away from windows. If there is no basement, go to an interior room, like a closet, on the ground floor. 

 

Prepare a Disaster Supply Kit

 

Electricity, water, heat, air conditioning or telephone service may not work in an emergency. Preparing disaster supply kits in advance can save precious time in the event you must evacuate or go without utilities for an extended period.
 

Store items for a “go” kit in an easy-to-carry bag and keep in a car or in the garage. The “home” kit can be stored in a plastic tub or garbage can and kept in your home’s safest place where you will take shelter.
 

Consider including the following items when putting together your disaster supply kit:

  • At least a 3-day supply of water (1 gallon per person per day). Store water in sealed, unbreakable containers. Replace every 6 months.
  • A 3- to 5-day supply of nonperishable packaged or canned food and a non-electric can opener.
  • A change of clothing, rain gear and sturdy shoes.
  • Blankets, bedding or sleeping bags.
  • A first aid kit and prescription medications (be sure to check expiration dates).
  • An extra pair of glasses or contact lenses and solution.
  • Special items for infants, the elderly or family members with disabilities.
  • A battery-powered radio, a flashlight and extra batteries.

Identify Your Safest Place at Home, Work

 

Before an emergency strikes, take time to identify your safest place at home, at work and at school. Many people have survived strong tornadoes in a closet or small interior room without windows. Usually the safest place will be on the lowest floor. If you live in a mobile home, identify the nearest sturdy building – it may not be safe to remain in a mobile home during a storm.

At schools, offices and hospitals, preparedness plans are especially important due to the large number of people on hand and the large amount of glass at many sites. Know the safest place for you to shelter in place and make sure others know their assigned location as well. At shopping malls, indoor pools and gymnasiums, long spanning buildings are commonly found. These locations can be dangerous because the entire roof can been supported by the outside walls. If caught in such an open building, the restroom may be the best place to take shelter.

If possible, one of the best ways to prepare for survival in Tornado Alley states like Oklahoma is to build or install a SafeRoom in your home or workplace. Your local emergency manager or homebuilders association will have information about SafeRooms. Plan how to get to your safest place, and share the information with your family.

 

View this information as an infographic

 

After the Storm

Once severe weather has passed, be prepared for possible flooding to occur. Also, watch for downed power lines and never drive into high water.

Tornado Safety

Tuesday, 17 May, 2016

Tornado in OklahomaTornadoes

Description

The tornado is the most violent storm on Earth. A tornado is a rapidly rotating column of air extending to the ground from a thunderstorm cloud. The path width of a tornado is usually very narrow, but can range up to a half-mile or more in the most extreme cases. Tornadoes usually only last a few minutes, but a few can last for much longer, traveling along the ground for several miles. Tornadoes can remain almost stationary, or can race across the countryside at speeds over 50 mph. Violent winds in and near the tornado can cause incredible destruction, and can generate flying debris, which is the main thing that hurts people in tornadoes.

Tornado Safety

Keeping informed about the weather is the best way to avoid being caught in a tornado or severe thunderstorm. Your local National Weather Service Forecast Office provides information about dangerous weather in your area, and you should keep a close eye on this information whenever storms threaten your area. A battery operated NOAA Weather Radio with a warning alarm feature should be a part of your information system!

It’s also critical that you think about tornado safety long before there’s a storm on the horizon, and plan what you will do to stay safe no matter where you may be when storms threaten.

When a severe storm or tornado threatens, remember these basic guidelines:

GET IN - get as far inside a strong building as you can, away from doors and windows

GET DOWN - get to the lowest floor

COVER UP - use whatever you can to protect yourself from flying or falling debris

•A reinforced underground storm shelter, storm cellar, enclosed basement or safe room are usually the safest places in a tornado. Underground shelters get you out of the way of flying and falling debris, which is a tornado’s most lethal weapon.

•If you cannot get underground, remember the basic guidelines. Get as far inside the strongest building you can find. Stay away from doors, windows and other openings to the outside. Put as many walls between you and the outside as you can.

•Get as low as you can. Go to the lowest floor of the building you’re in.

•Cover up to protect yourself from flying and falling debris. Use whatever you can find - pillows, blankets, sleeping bags, mattresses. Wearing a helmet or hardhat will help protect your head from debris.

•Being outdoors, in a mobile home, or in a vehicle are all unsafe in a tornado or severe thunderstorm. Find stronger shelter before the storm arrives and remember to get in, get down and cover up.

 

 

More information

•Tornado Project Online has a wealth of tornado information as well as with tornado myths, tornado oddities, personal experiences, tornado chasing and tornado safety.

•FEMA Are You Ready? has terms and tips for what to do before and during a tornado and preparing a safe room.

•American Red Cross: Tornado suggests how to prepare a home tornado plan, assemble a disaster supplies kit and what to do before, during and after a tornado.

•Historical information on Oklahoma tornadoes.

•Frequently Asked Questions about Tornadoes.

•FEMA tornado site for kids.

•Preparing a Safe Room has guidelines and instructions for building a safe room.

 

Registering Your Storm Shelter

Thursday, 11 September, 2014

shelterIn the event of a severe weather disaster, pre-registration of your storm shelter enables rescue personnel to locate your shelter more efficiently. The information you provide will be mapped on Google Earth and used to locate your shelter so that rescue personnel can check on your well-being and secure your safety in the event that your shelter's exit should become blocked by fallen debris.  

Storm Shelters

Thursday, 11 September, 2014

PhotoTornadoDamage1We continually strive to raise public awareness on severe weather safety and emergency preparedness. Thank you for being proactive and taking the initiative to determine a plan.  
Over the past several years, the majority of fatalities suffered due to severe storms, have been the result of people leaving their homes to seek shelter elsewhere. We encourage the public to "shelter in place" during severe weather...

This program has been developed to provide a comprehensive emergency management process for Duncan and Stephens County. It seeks to mitigate the effects of hazards, prepare for measures to be taken which will preserve life and minimize damage, enhance response during emergencies and provide necessary assistance, and establish a recovery system in order to return the county to it's normal state of affairs.

CERT - Stephens County Emergency Management.

C.E.R.T.(Community Emergency Response Team)

The CERT Program was created to spearhead the effort to harness the power of every individual through training, education, and volunteer service to make a community safer, stronger, and better prepared to respond to disasters.

 

LEPC - Stephens County Emergency Management

LEPC(Local Emergency Planning Committee)

The LEPC is to ensure the development of all hazard emergency plans that, during the time of actual or inpending disasters and emergencies, will endeavor to minimize the loss of life and propert and to maintain and provide information concerning the Community Right To-Know regulations.

 

Emergency Management

Sunday, 25 December, 2011

Stephens County Emergency Management Stephens County Emergency Management strives to protect the lives and property of all the citizens of Stephens County.

More

Director

gary ballGary Ball
Emergency Management Director.
+1 580 255 3411
 
 

About Stephens County OK.com

Welcome to the official website of Stephens County Oklahoma. The Purpose of this site is to help connect the people of Stephens County with participating government offices as well as other local information. Please let us know if you have any questions.